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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
-hour -- the british prime minister since a shock wave through the eu, promising a referendum on britain's membership. >> time to cobble together a coalition after the israeli prime minister just scrapes through with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one tha
in algeria, but experts of his speech have been released. he will say that more of the same in the eu is not enough. he is also expected to demand a renegotiation of britain's membership with the block and then put the new terms to a public referendum. critics say he is pandering to euro skeptics in his own conservative party. for more on britain's relationship with the eu, we spoke to the president of the european parliament and asked first why he was so opposed to prime minister cameron's efforts to reclaim some of the powers london has ceded to brussels. >> i think we would need a stronger euro, but not a divided -- a stronger europe but not a divided europe, and i'm really surprised that britain is not a member of the euro. it would be useful that other countries and britain agreed the charter. we need a deeper integration of europe, and not a distraction of the european union. >> cameron seems headed down this road anyway with the threat of leaving the eu hanging in the background. is that fair? is he holding the eu to ransom? >> that would be really a disaster for great britain,
>> today, public disillusionment with the eu is at an all-time high. referendum on europe's future. you're watching al jazeera. a third term for benjamin is in yahoo! with a narrow win forcing the coalition with new sets of rivals. north korea threatens to step up its nuclear program after the u.n. condemns decembers rocket launch. >> a panel on the country's top court could throw out the jail sentence of a french woman serving time for kidnapping. more coming up. >> britain's prime minister says he will let the public decide if they want to stay in the european union if he's reelected. david cameron ended months of speculation by promising a referendum on the question, it he is backing. 2015. however, he said that he prefers britain to stay in member of the you. -- in the -- state a member of the eu. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i want a better deal for britain. but not just for britain, but for europe, too. i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed
for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last, david cameron delivered his speech on europe. he began with a repeat of what has gone wrong. the ever closer eu integration, a more flexible approach from what is required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail, and the british people will drift toward the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success, and i want the relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. >> the prime minister said the main problem with the growing gap between the european union and those is the there was resentment about rules and regulations. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> the solution, he said, was to try to claw back some power from the eu, and then when that was done, put it to the people. >> when we negotiate that new settlements, we will
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
of there being a straight referendum on being an in/out referendum, part of the eu, not part of the eu, which is mixed from where most people think they are. >> some of the surveys show the people becoming more worried about it and we saw those comments, what's his face, labor leader over the weekend saying that he's walking out of the eurozone. so clearly, he finds that there's political gain to be made from -- >> and then you saw this british train commerce survey, just 26% of them wanted to keep the status quo, right? >> i thought this was extraordinary. i was surprises how low it is. in this survey, when you ask businesses about how much in favor they are of keeping things the same, only 24%. >> 59% wanted a looser relationship with the eurozone. most people would say, we want to stay part of the eu, but we would like to have far less regulation, far less judgments than just have been contemplated from the european court. >> is britain going to be able to say that where they get rid of the regulation and teen the market and all that? >> that's the number one question. >> and we will explo
his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
to seek a fresh settlement with the eu and then to seek the consent of the british people to that settlement. >> i can confirm that that is exactly what i believe this country should do. it is the right thing for britain, because it is right that we are involved in the single market and are active players in the eu, but there are changes that we would like in our relationship that would be good for britain and good for europe, and because of the changes taking place in the eurozone, which is driving a lot of the change in the european union, there is every opportunity to achieve that settlement and then seek consent for it. >> a colleague of lord marland said, "he likes the foreign travel, leading trade delegations, meeting foreign leaders, but wasn't so keen on the detailed" policy of his new job. hmm, i wonder if the prime minister knows anybody else like that. >> the honorable gentleman had all morning to think of that! it is important that we have ministers in both houses who are linking up with the fastest-growing countries in the world. that is why our exports to chi
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
. in the house of commons last wednesday, he naswered questions about britain's rule in the eu and they talked about the helicopter crash that killed two people. this is just over half an hour. a way that rewards hard work. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mrspeake >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole hous will wish to join me in paying tribute to richard reginald walker, 28 engine regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. it is clear to see from the tributes paid that he was outstanding soldier and mutual respect. are deep assemblies are are with his family and his friends at this difficult time. mr. speaker, i would also lik to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further ch meetings later today. >> for too long many women and especially ard working s
eu joins us from beijing with more of the details. eunice, there have been questions about china's reliability in data. over the past couple of years. >> there's always a big question about that. in fact, goldman sachs and ubs were some of the brokerages that came out recently questioning the latest december numbers for the export figures. they were concerned that the export numbers reported by china didn't seem to match the export data from its trading partners and the slow at some of the ports. that was raising questions. the chinese officials came out and defended the numbers and said that the numbers were all well and good. there is so much skepticism about that. the trade data was looking as though it was very much in flux. however, when you take a look at those in isolation, it raises a lot of question marks. but in terms of going forward, how you read these data points, most economists say you have to look at them as guidelines. this is a developing economy. so in terms of guidelines, the latest figures that we saw for 2012 in terms of gdp or for industrial output and ever
britain should leave the e.u. and what that would mean. that has a lot of people talking here about the implications for the u.k., for europe. whether -- we had this big discussion about new york versus london. what happens to the banking system. what happens to the financial? that is the u.k. that's become a big i issue. let's bring in a good friend, as i said, of "squawk." bob hormatz, you know him well. a new -- not a fancy new title, but you're the under secretary of state for economic growth, energy, and the environment. that changed a year ago? >> yes, we tried to pull these together. increasingly what happens in the economy has an impact on the environment. environmental issues and energy issues are increasingly intertwined. >> always big in davos. and david cameron, it has an impact on the global economy if this were to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s.
or not to stay in the european union, britain one of the e.u.'s largest economy, the most important financial center, and, oh, yes, the pound sterling at odds with the euro. markets up more than 4% year to date. my next guest says while some investors are still on the sidelines, we're beginning to see a little bit more interest. joining us now with his outlook for the markets and the economy, of course, chief investment strategist for ubs wealth management, mike ryan. mike, good to have you here. >> good to be here. lou: a lot of fun in the european union. start there. we're not hearing so much about the collapse of the e.u., david cameron has other ideas, but the reality seems to be that things are quieting down a bit over there and not influencing our markets nearly so much. >> i think that's fair. i think what we're seeing, really, in the eurozone is an absence of mall las. the last couple years, an existential crisis, would the euro and player survive? a lot has been taken off the table by the posture of the european central bank saying we're standing behind the sovereigns. where does the
%, the transport budget by 15% and the police budget by 20%, how can we even be giving up on a cut in the e.u. budget before the negotiations have begun? >> we have to make cuts in budgets, because we're dealing with a record debt and deficit. but if he wants to talk about consistency, perhaps he can explain why his own members of the european parliament voted against the budget freeze that we achieved last year? perhaps he can explain why the socialist group in the european parliament that he's such a proud member of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget? and while they're at it, they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his policy? >> the reality is this: he can't convince anyone on europe. last year he announced out of the december negotiations with a veto and the agreement went ahead anyway. you've thrown in the towel even before these negotiations have begun. he can't convince european leaders, he can't even convince his own back benchers. he is weak abroad, he is weak at home
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat to what david cameron said there in that sound bite. he wants more competition in europe, more accountability, better growth and wants us to get out of the eurozone debt crisis. he wants to renegotiate with eu
early to say. i think the eu has taken action, the situation is much more stabilized, uncertainties have reduced. so i think we are on the right path for further growth. >> it's going to be a reasonably good year. if you exclude europe, i would say it's going to be a good year for the industry, but when you include europe, it's going to be exceptionally good. we are looking at the car market with the construction of 8%. we are protecting 3% of construction for 2013. i don't think in europe we are still in the recovery mode. except europe, growth everywhere. >> you see the different twist or europe in particular dpifg more stability. it's about combining different disabilities to reboost growth. >> all right. the final quote there coming back little by little, maria. >> yeah. a big diversified group of executives talking about the environment. joining us right now is the ceo of coca-cola, muhtar. it's great to see you. >> great to see you. >> what do you think? >> well, we continue to see opportunities everywhere in the world, the kind of opportunities are continuing to contract the code
's going to do a referendum on whether or not to keep the uk in the eu. what would be the implications if the eu has left? >> i think we are still quite far from that happening. of course, this announcement of a referendum years from now is creating uncertainty and is not necessarily helpful in terms of stabilizing the economy, neither in the uk or in the european union. >> do you think changes need to be made in terms of policies to encourage the uk to stay? >> in fact, many of the elements or the policy agenda of david cameron are something which are very important and the commission is working for the confidence of european industry, a rather comprehensive free trade agenda as well as the competition of the single market. this beneath for restoration of the european industry and of returning to sustainable growth and better employment. but there is no need to leave the european union for the policy -- >> this morning, as you well know, the foreign affairs and trade, as well, there's quite a lot of support around europe for david cameron's thought process of what he wants to achieve
and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders of the eu and other entities here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> and we've got a natural gas boom, an oil boom, we've got thanks to low interest rates what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen. in fact it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen. there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election of last november, been through a fiscal cliff debate, working our way through a debt ceiling debate, i think in a responsible manner, with an eye towards trying to fix some problems. >> when you look at the options out there, president obama's budget proposal and paul ryan's offer, they both don't do what guys like you say need to be done, bal
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
cameron speaking this morning. does that have any impact on your business? >> it does in a way. because u.s./eu trade is the one trade agreement that the u.s. has not done. that the europeans desperately need to get done. >> right. so the uk being part of that yes or no i would venture to say our government is going to have a lot to stay about the uk staying part of the eu i think as has been indicated. >> did you catch any of the comments about tax avoidance, sort of global tax avoidance issue? >> no, i did not. i'll stay quiet on that one. >> the other big topic here, energy. >> yes. >> and in particular, the u.s. energy situation, shale, fracking, et cetera, you bullish, you bearish, where do you think we really are? i mean people have prognosticated for now awhile that we were going to get there but doesn't seem like we're there. >> andrew, i think it is the bull case for the world. so to answer your question, i'm billish. and i think it's a game changer. and i think it is probably the story of global economic recovery if handled right. and frankly, the beneficiaries of that will be the u.s
cameron vowing a referendum on whether britain remains in the eu. in japan, longest losing streak in two months. china awaits data, that's out tonight. the road map in the u.s. starts off at the golden arches. u.s. same-store sales up 9% for mcdonald's, helped by the dollar menu and mcrib. >> ibm and google surging premarket. google gets its price target raised by six firms this morning on better than expected earnings. >> coach getting pummeled this morning, blaming its big earnings miss on weakness in north america during the holidays. it says it is transforming itself into a lifestyle brand. >> apple's results tonight after the bell. could this be the quarter that marks the bottom on the stock. will tim cook talk about the next omg product in the pipeline. >>> we'll start with mcdonald's. it earned 1.38 nds the fourth quarter, it exceeded estimates. ceo don thompson said for the near term, mcdonald's expects top and bottom line growth to remain under pressure with january global comp sales expected to be negative. jim, it's come a long way since the mid-80s here. still pressure on mar
. -- that our current immigration system is not working effectively, indeed is 235eu8ing 0en 00 -- indeed is failing ton a daily basis cannot be denied. it needs to be fixed. it is a challenge for us to do so and will not be easy. i would, however, warn my colleagues that a framework is not a bill. and in 2006 and 2007 with the full support of the republican president of the united states, a bipartisan committee announced with great confidence that they had a plan that was going to fix our immigration system and we were all just going to line upped and vote for it much the masters of the universe had decided -- they'd meat in secret, they had all the special interest groups gather and they had worked out a plan that was going to change our immigration system for the better and we should all be most grateful. it came up with 2006, it did not pass. it came back again in 2007 with even more emphasis, and it failed coul loss -- and it failed colossally. it did not do it what they said it would do. it did not end the illegality. it did not set forth a proper principle of immigration for amer
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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